General Questions


Billing and Payments FAQ


Records FAQ


Delinquent and/or Unruly FAQ


Traffic FAQ

 

 

 

 


Adult Contributing FAQ

 


Victim Services FAQ

 


Community Service FAQ




Mentors FAQ

 

 



General Questions

 

How do I prepare for Court?

  • Arrive on time. The Court schedules hearings to begin on time. Make sure to allocate time to park, process through security and meet with your attorney or other court personnel prior to your hearing time.
  • Dress appropriately. No tank tops, flip flops, hats, low-cut shirts, skirts, or shorts.
  • Unless small children will be testifying at the hearing, do not bring them.
  • Turn off Cell phones
  • If you have police reports, medical reports, photos or other evidence, it maybe helpful to bring it with you both hearings.

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How do I apply for an internship?

Please send your cover letter and resume to the Delaware County Juvenile Court Attention: Anne Konarski, 140 North Sandusky Street, Delaware, Ohio 43015

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Why do I have to come to Juvenile Court now that I am 18?

  • The Court maintains jurisdiction over individuals who committed offenses under the age of 18 for the duration of the case.
  • Adults who have been charged with contributing to the delinquency of a minor are also required to appear.

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Billing and Payments FAQ

 

What information is needed when I am making a payment?

To ensure that the payment is applied correctly, please include the case number and the fees that the funds are to be applied.

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Can I get an itemized bill?

Itemized bills can be printed upon request. You can do this in person at the Delaware County Juvenile Court in the clerks office during normal court hours. If there are questions regarding the bill contact the Juvenile Court at 740-833-2600.

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I am a victim of an alleged delinquent child. How to I pursue restitution compensation for an alleged delinquent act committed against me?

Please contact the Victim Services department at the Delaware County Juvenile Court; 740-833-2662

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Who do I contact if there is an issue with my bill?

If you have any questions regarding a bill that was received please contact the main Juvenile Court telephone line at 740-833-2600.

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Records FAQ

 

How do I obtain a copy of paperwork filed in a case in the juvenile court?

Please visit the records department of the Delaware County Juvenile Court or contact the office directly at 740-833-2667.

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Can my record be sealed or expunged?

There are specific requirements sealing and expungment of records. The Court can provide a blank form to apply.

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What is the difference between sealed records and expunged records?

A sealed record is set aside and can be reviewed only under certain limited circumstances.  An expunged record is permanently deleted and cannot be retrieved.

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If my criminal or traffic record has been sealed, do I have to disclose the offenses on a job application?

If your record is expunged or sealed, persons requesting information about your record will be told that no record exists.  

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Delinquent and/or Unruly FAQ

 


My child is in detention, what now?

Juveniles held in detention are at the Central Ohio Youth Center (COYC  http://www.coyc.org/about-coyc/general-information). A hearing will be scheduled at the Delaware County Juvenile Court. Please contact the Court with any questions as to the time and location of the hearing.

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Who is permitted to visit my child in detention?

  • Visitation:  Visitation is restricted to parents/legal guardians and is limited to 20 minutes unless otherwise approved by the Superintendent.  Visitation is on the following days and times:

          Tuesday             6:00pm-7:00pm
          Saturday            10:00am-11:00am
          Sunday              1:00pm-2:00pm

  • Probation/parole officers may visit any day without an appointment.  All other visitors must have an appointment and the approval of the placing agency to visit.

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What is the difference between a juvenile delinquent and a serious youthful offender?

  • Juveniles charged as a serious youthful offender are, generally speaking, charged with committing delinquent acts that are more serious in nature than other delinquent acts. In order to be charged as a serious youthful offender, a juvenile must be indicted by Grand Jury to be prosecuted .
  • If a juvenile is found to be a serious youthful offender, and adjudicated as such, the Court can impose  a combination of the two of a juvenile disposition and/or an adult sentence. The Court may retain jurisdiction up to age twenty-one.

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Does a juvenile have a right to a jury trial?

No

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Are juvenile proceedings accessible to the public?

Yes, some limitations apply.

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Traffic FAQ

 

Do I have to appear in Court or can I pay a waiver?

Most juvenile traffic offenses require a personal appearance. In the instance that the offense doesn’t require a personal appearance the Juvenile Court will contact the juvenile and parents directly.

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Will the officer/deputy/trooper who issued me the citation be at the hearing date and time that I received on the citation or the formal arraignment time set by the Court?

The officer/deputy/trooper will not be present at the formal arraignment.

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I am now 18 does that make a difference?

The Juvenile Court maintains jurisdiction over offenses that happened prior to the age of 18.

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Do I have to take the CarTeens course or similar course if it was ordered in traffic court?

If a driving course is court ordered it is required to be completed. Failure to do so could result in an additional hearing being scheduled or other actions taken by the Court. 

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Do I need an attorney?

An attorney is not required, however if you would like to speak to an attorney you have the right to do so. 

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Custody, Visitation and Support FAQ


Who has Custody?

Married parents each have full custody of their child/children until a court of competent jurisdiction allocates parental rights.

An unmarried female is the residential parent and legal custodian of her child until such time a court of proper jurisdiction issues orders designating another person as the legal custodian.

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What is Custody?

Custody is the care, control, and maintenance of a child. A child's parents are both presumed to be the natural and proper custodians. However, the court may be asked to determine the custody of a child in some circumstances. The best interest of the child guides the court's decision. There are several types of custody:

  • Shared Parenting is a custodial determination when both parents retain joint custody and responsibility for the care and control of the child. The parents have joint authority to make decisions concerning the child, even though the child's primary residence may be with only one parent.
  • Joint physical custody is when both parents share physical and custodial care of the child.
  • Sole custody gives one parent the primary responsibility for the care of the child. That parent makes all the daily decisions about his/her child's life.

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What is Parenting Time?

Time spent with a child by a parent.
A parent who does not have primary physical custody of a child is legally entitled to seek parenting time with that child. There are exceptions to this when it is not in the best interest of the child.

If the parents cannot agree to a parenting time schedule in mediation, or on their own, the magistrate/judge will order a schedule. This can include general parenting time days as well as holidays, school breaks, summer, vacations, and special occasions.

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Who Handles Custody, Parenting Time, Visitation, and Support Issues?

Custody, parenting time, visitation, and support determinations are made in the Juvenile Division and Domestic Relations Division of the Court of Common Pleas. If you do not already have an order from another court, you may file a Complaint requesting custody, parenting time or visitation, in the proper court of a county. If you do have an order from this court granting you custody, parenting time or visitation and you wish to amend (change) that order, you may file a motion in the Clerk's Office, of the proper jurisdiction.

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Why are Custody, Parenting Time and Visitation Hearings Held?

These hearings are necessary when parents do not live together and cannot agree on what is best for their children, when a parent cannot take care of his/her children, or when someone believes a child is in danger from a parent or caretaker.

Custody may be placed with a non-parent only if there is "clear and convincing" evidence that it is necessary for the best interest of the child.

Grandparent Power of Attorney is available upon request.

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What is a Guardian Ad Litem

A Guardian Ad Litem (GAL) is a lawyer, appointed by the court in a civil proceeding to represent the best interests of a child or a person under disability. A GAL may be appointed for a child in the following situations:

  • Custody and parenting time cases.
  • The child is alleged to be abused or neglected.
  • The child is the subject of an entrustment agreement.
  • The child is the subject of a petition terminating parental rights.
  • Where a parent seeks to be relieved of custody.
  • Where the child seeks emancipation.
  • In mental health commitment proceedings.
  • For foster care plans or status reviews.
  • In addition, a GAL may be appointed in all other cases that, in the discretion of the court, require a GAL to represent the best interest of a child or children.

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How are Custody, Shared Parenting, Parenting Time, Visitation, Child Medical Orders and Support Orders Enforced?

Any order of the court--including-custody, parenting time, visitation, and support orders--can be enforced by filing a motion with the court requiring the other party to "Show Cause" why he or she should not be held in contempt of court for failing to follow the court's prior orders.

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What Does “Support” Mean?

Child support and medical support are established either by an administrative order issued by the Child Support Agency or court order issued by a court of proper jurisdiction. The amount of a child support order and/or a medical support order is based on a formula that primarily considers the income of both parents, number of children to benefit from the order, the cost of work/school related daycare for the same children, the marginal cost to provide health care, dental, and/or vision coverage for the same children, support paid or received for other natural children of the parents not subjects of the order. Child support and medical support are to be paid each month for the support of the minor children and/or to provide funds for health care, dental, and/or vision insurance.

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How is Child Support Calculated?

Child support is based upon the combined gross income of the parents involved. The court uses the Ohio Child Support Guidelines, which are part of state law, to guide decisions on child support.

There are a number of expenses that can be added to the financial responsibility including (but not limited to) health care costs, extraordinary medical or dental expenses, and child care costs. Adjustments may also be made depending on which parent is paying health care costs, etc.

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How is Child Support Paid?

Child support if paid directly to the other party is considered a gift. It must be paid through the Ohio Child Support Payment Central (OCSPC), PO BOX 182372, Columbus, Ohio 43218-2372. Child support and Medical support are more commonly paid through wage withholding orders.

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What is CSEA?

The Child Support Enforcement Agency (CSEA) is a county agency that assists in the establishment of child support and medical support orders and the collection of said child support and medical support. A person who seeks child support and/or medical support for a child may contact CSEA for their services and assistance. CSEA is the channel for support from one parent to another parent or legal custodian.

In other words, the person owing support can send money to CSEA or OCSPC, or it will be taken from their wages or bank accounts then forward payment to OCSPC and send it to the person who is ordered to receive it. CSEA then has a record of collections and distributions of the support money.

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Do I Need a Lawyer to File for Support?

You don't necessarily need a lawyer to file for child support. You may represent yourself. However, you should bring all documents available to prove your financial position, including pay stubs, copies of medical bills, copies of income tax returns, etc. (This court requires you to file copies of all this information in advance of any hearings.)
If you have questions about child support, you can contact CSEA at 740-833-2720 or OCSPC at 1-800-960-2372.

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Where Can I File for Support?

Support determination can be made in Juvenile Court and Domestic Relations Court or through CSEA. If there is not an order from another court, you may file a complaint for child support, medical support or motion for child support or medical support in the proper Court or with CSEA. CSEA is located on the third floor of the juvenile court building. For questions you can contact the Juvenile Court at 740-833-3590 for information or CSEA 740-833-2720.

If you already have an order for support through this court and you want the court to consider changing that order, you may file a “Motion” at the Clerk's Office on the ground floor of the Hayes Building.

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How is Jurisdiction determined in matters of child custody?

Jurisdiction is based on the state and county in which the child resides with a parent or legal custodian on the date of the filing or the state that is the home state of the child within six months before the commencement of the proceeding and that the child is absent from the state but a parent acting as a parent continues to live in this state.

A Court of another state or county does have jurisdiction under this section if a court of the home state of the child has declined to exercise jurisdiction on the basis that this state is a more appropriate forum.
The child and the child’s parents or the child and at least one parent or person acting as a parent, have a significant connection with this state other than mere physical presence.
Substantial evidence is available in this state concerning the child’s care, protection, training, and personal relationships.

All courts having proper jurisdiction have declined to exercise jurisdiction on the ground that a court of this state is more appropriate forum to determine the custody of the child.

No court of any other state would have jurisdiction under the criteria specified above.

Final determination of jurisdiction is made by the Court in which action is filed or by agreement of the Court in which the action is filed and the prior court that has exercised proper jurisdiction .

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What is a Non-Oral Hearing and do I have to appear?

Your appearance is not required for a Non-Oral Hearing. There is no actual hearing held. Non-Oral Hearings is a date for the Judge or Magistrate to review the case and allows them a set time to address pending motions.

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What are the cost associated with filing for Custody, Shared Parenting Time, Visitation, and child support matters?

The initial filing fee for a Shared Custody, Parenting, and Visitation complaint is $150.00.
Motions on existing cases are $20.00, the exception to motion to continue, dismiss, appear, change of counsel, withdrawal of counsel and any others at the Courts discretion.

There is no charge for any matters involving Child Support.

If parties utilize the process of mediation the cost is $50.00 per party.

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How can I get a copy of prior orders or filings in a case?

Copies of matters in Delaware County Juvenile Court can be requested in the Clerk’s office of the Delaware County Juvenile Court. There is a fee of .05 cents per page.

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Can court personnel assist with filling out paperwork?

Court personnel are not able to assist in filling out paperwork unless the party filing is unable to complete the paperwork on their own due to a disability.

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I can not afford a lawyer, who can help me?

The Andrews House offers a free legal clinic the third Tuesday of the Month.
http://andrewshouse.org/programs/legal_clinic.html

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Adult Contributing FAQ


I am an adult why am I summons to appear in the juvenile Court?

The Delaware County Juvenile Court has jurisdiction over adults who are charged with contributing to the unruliness or delinquency of a child (Ohio Revised Code 2919.24).

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 Who is considered to be a minor in Ohio?

In Ohio a minor is considered anyone under the age of 18.

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What are the possible penalties for contributing to the delinquency of a minor in Ohio?

The most extreme penalties the Court could order upon an adult charged with the unruliness or delinquency of a child is a fine of up to $1,00 and/or 6 months of incarceration. Other forms of sentencing orders can include, but are not limited to, community control sanctions fines and community service hours.

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Victim Services FAQ


How do I get a Juvenile Civil Protection Order?

  1. Complete the petition on your own or with an attorney or the assistance of the Delaware County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office Victim Services Unit. To make an appointment or for attorney referrals please contact the Victim Services Unit at 740-833-2710

 

 

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Community Service FAQ

What are the Benefits of the S.P.I.C.E. Garden?

  1. Youth will be able to see the direct results of their efforts whether they work in the garden for one day or many days.
  2. Provide a setting in which these youth have an opportunity to create positive relationships with peers and adults.
  3. Transforming an empty, trash littered lot into a beautiful, productive garden full of herbs, vegetable and flowers.
  4. Provide an opportunity for any misconceptions the community may hold regarding court-involved youth to be erased.

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What is done with the Produce?
The produce from the garden will be sold in the Clerks office of the Delaware County Juvenile Court and all proceeds will be used to continue funding the garden. Any left over produce will be donated the local food pantry.

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What is the S.P.I.C.E. garden?
The S.P.I.C.E. garden is an innovative way to help youth to increase their sense of self-esteem and self-respect by giving them new skills with a project that allows them to experience the tangible products of their efforts, both as individuals and a group.

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Who is working in the S.P.I.C.E. Garden?
Youth from a number of court programs, including our community service programs, will be providing the bulk of the labor necessary to make the S.P.I.C.E. garden a success. The program anticipates the participation of approximately one hundred youth and many community members.


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Mentors FAQ

What is the length of time you serve as a mentor?

1 year or longer

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Which days/hours can you mentor?

At your convenience

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Where can I take my mentee?

Varies, depending on how much support your mentee needs

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What are some common activities I can do with my mentee?

Fix a meal, go out for coffee, go to the park, go thrift store shopping, take baby to the library and baby well checks and appointments

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What skills will I teach my mentee?

How to cook a healthy meal, fiscal responsibility, the importance of baby well checks, how to schedule appointments and talk to different agencies to acquire the support needed, feeding and bathing the baby

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What will my mentor be like?

A guide, trusted friend, good listener, a supporter

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What will I do with my mentor?

Spend time with mentor, learn new skills, learn about helpful agencies within the county

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How often will I see my mentor?

Have a visit or phone conversation at least once a week and attend monthly group meetings

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